mardi 27 juin 2017

Chinese province runs entirely on renewable energy for 7 days

A province in China just showed it is indeed possible to source all of our power from renewable energy. Qinghai Province ran solely on solar, wind, and hydropower for a week. The province, which is home to over five million people, used up the amount of electricity that 535,000 tons of coal could have generated in those seven days - without all the air-polluting carbon emissions.

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Scientists discover water has not one, but two liquid phases

You know water exists as a solid, liquid, and gas. But you're wrong about that, according to an international team of 19 scientists. They found out liquid water actually has two phases - low and high density - and can fluctuate between them. While providing new information, the new research reminds us how much we still don't know about the substance covering over 70 percent of the planet. Related:

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Washington's new Tukwila Library is topped with a carbon-negative green roof

Architecture firm Perkins+Will announced the completion of their Tukwila Library in King County– a 10,000-square-foot building inspired by the city's diverse community where over 80 different world languages are spoken. The new library combines a variety of public spaces and sustainable design strategies, including a green roof with a negative-carbon footprint. The library, built for the King County Library System, is located 20 minutes south of Seattle in Tukwila, Washington. It features a...

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Gulf of Mexicos dead zone in 2017 could be the largest on record

When humans abuse the environment and dump nitrate-and phosphorous-heavy pollutants into rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, oxygen-deprived “dead zones” form. This is exactly what has occurred in the Gulf of Mexico and is leading to the largest algae bloom in the world forming. Roughly the size of Connecticut, the substantial “dead zone” is the wake-up call consumers need to change their habits — hopefully before it is too late. https://youtu.be/5cj0JK_sipg Algae blooms, such...

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This tiny off-grid cabin in the UK is clad with reclaimed slate tiles

This rustic writer's retreat in UK's Snowdonia National Park has carefully arranged openings that capture small vignettes and views of the gorgeous windswept hills and grazing pastures of Mid Wales. Architecture studio TRIAS covered the Slate Cabin with local stone and slate tiles reclaimed from nearby farms, basing their design around local and historically significant materials. The cabin is set in a lush green valley surrounded by hills and pastures of the Snowdonia National Park. The structure...

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These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

Could the buildings of the future be grown instead of built? Brunel University student Aleksi Vesaluoma has found a way to grow living structures using mushroom mycelium. Vesaluoma worked with architecture firm Astudio on her Grown Structures, which offer a waste-free, organic alternative to conventional construction materials.

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Tipping points accelerated climate change in the last Ice Age, new research shows

Could environmental tipping points really influence the Earth's climate all that much? A new study from an international team of four scientists says yes. Their study is the first to show that in our planet's past, gradual changes in carbon dioxide concentrations hit tipping points that then set off temperature spikes of as much as 10 degrees Celsius in only a few decades. Related:

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